Fairycraft

Fairycraft

Following the Path of Fairy Witchcraft

Following the call of the Old Gods along the path of the Fair Folk.


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An in-depth manual for practicing Fairy Witchcraft including theology, fairy lore, rituals, holidays, and magical practices. This book aims to pick up where Pagan Portals - Fairy Witchcraft leaves off and teach interested people the comprehensive practice of this system of honoring the Fair Folk and liminal Gods by blending the old Fairy Faith with modern paganism.

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Fairycraft Morgan Daimler Moon Books www.moon-books.net c/o John Hunt Publishing, Ltd. www.johnhuntpublishing.com 9781785350511 $21.95 pbk / $3.99 Kindle amazon.com Synopsis: An in-depth manual for practicing Fairy Witchcraft including theology, fairy lore, rituals, holidays, and magical practices. This book aims to pick up where Pagan Portals - Fairy Witchcraft leaves off and teach interested people the comprehensive practice of this system of honoring the Fair Folk and liminal Gods by blending the old Fairy Faith with modern paganism. Critique: Fairycraft: Following the Path of Fairy Witchcraft is fascinating to browse for creative inspiration. The simple rituals and prayers to honor forces unseen can be incorporated into one's daily actions, used as meditative focus, or simply practiced out of respect for the wonderful and mysterious natural world. "When outdoors, if you find yourself in danger from anything Fey, one method to protect yourself is to cross running water. It is best if the water you cross is south-running, as anything moving southwards, like anything moving sunwise, has positive and blessing qualities. This method of protection is also said to work against ghosts and malignant spirits." Also highly recommended for metaphysical studies shelves is author Morgan Daimler's previous title, "Pagan Portals - Fairy Witchcraft: A Neopagan's Guide to the Celtic Fairy Faith" (9781782793434, $9.95 pbk / $3.03 Kindle). ~ Metaphysical Studies Shelf, Midwest Book Reviews

In Fairycraft, Daimler outlines the basics of witchcraft and Paganism rooted in the fairy faith. Essentially, she combines modern Neopagan witchcraft paths with old folklore surrounding fairies. It’s a veritable treasure chest of information, including detailed descriptions of various kinds of fairy from Celtic, Viking and other European traditions, but perhaps even more notable is the quantity of material that practitioners can put to use straight away: Guidance on how to approach the fae, advice on offerings, templates for fairy-based rituals, guided meditations, and the usual lists of herbs, stones etc. For veteran witches much of this will be well-trodden territory, but Daimler is careful to always relate these parts back to the specifics of the Fairy so they retain a feeling of freshness. ~ Patheos, http://www.patheos.com/blogs/pagantama/2016/05/30/pagan-shinto-spiritual-book-reviews-may-2016/

Fairycraft is an introduction to a magical paradigm based in old fairy lore and modern neopagan witchcraft. Daimler’s approach to the “Good Neighbors” is serious and classic: unflinching in the face of the darker aspects of these entities. While recognizing that there are other possible cultural associations for the fairy realms, her focus is on the traditions coming to us from European sources: primarily Celtic, Germanic, and Nordic. Central to these ancestral faiths is a belief in the literal existence of the spirit world as opposed to a psychological model in which the practitioner is connecting to archetypes or aspects of the self — a postmodern approach unknown to our ancestors. “Polytheism is a key theology in Fairy Witchcraft and it is one that needs to be fully understood by anyone seeking to follow this path. The Gods are real and as such they have their own personalities as well as agency, which means they can and will directly influence things. And that is a blade that cuts both ways; yes they can act in helpful ways that benefit us, but they can also act in ways that are harmful.” (p. 29) The Gentry are a varied lot including many different orders of spirit ranging from benevolent to baneful, but with no hard distinction made betwixt the two. The most basic categorization between the Seelie and Unseelie courts indicate only an association with the bright or dark half of the year, respectively. Regardless of affiliation, each spirit is a unique individual. Whatever their nature the “Other Crowd” are said to respect proper etiquette; and are easily affronted because we may not understand all of their ways. The ethics of Fairy Witchcraft consist of those values which they have been shown to respect in the lore. Daimler names seven in particular: hospitality, generosity, kindness, compassion, courage, politeness, and adventuresomeness. Tales show that those exhibiting these traits tend to come to good ends while those engaging in their opposites are rightfully punished. Daimler’s position as a pagan parent also contributes her lived experience to the work. Unlike many magical traditions, Fairy Witchcraft places no age restriction upon practice as historically there were none. Children figure prominently in many myths for good or ill and whole communities engage in local seasonal rites. As religions go, this one is accessible to the developmental level of young children and provides a faith that grows with them. However, Fairy Witchcraft is not a tradition for the faint of heart. Once one opens the door to interaction with the wyrd one must take the fearsome with the bright. In example, regarding the famed Wild Hunt, Daimler writes: “In some cases the Hunt might offer to take a living person to ride with them, but the risk of doing so was great; the person might never return or might become a permanent part of the host. Seeing the Hunt could be an ill-omen and the Hunt itself could kill or drive a person mad, but conversely in some areas it was believed meeting the Hunt bravely and politely could earn a person great reward.” (p. 93) ~ Katina HaalandRamer., Sagewoman

An in-depth and detailed book about working with REAL fairy witchcraft, Morgan Daimler draws on her own vast wealth of knowledge and experience as well as traditional folk lore and ancient myths and legends. Definitely a must for those that wish to find out more about this intriguing pathway. ~ Rachel Patterson, author of A Kitchen Witch' s World of Magical Food and A Kitchen Witch's World of Magical Herbs & Plants

There are a number of books out there about faeries, and most describe something more akin to Tinkerbelle than real faeries. Only a rare few come close to describing the true nature of the fay and how to work with them. This is one of those rare gems. If you want to understand and work with real faeries this is the book for you. ~ Stephanie Woodfield, author of Celtic Lore & Spellcraft of the Dark Goddess: Invoking the Morrigan

Utterly comprehensive and compulsively readable guide to Fairycraft. ~ Brendan Howlin, author of The Handbook of Urban Druidry: Modern Druidry for All

ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Morgan Daimler
Morgan Daimler Morgan Daimler is a witch who has been a polytheist since the early ’90′s. Following a path inspired by the Irish Fairy Faith blended wi...
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